Retired Seattle Police Officers Association
 

Officer Harold Williams - 8/2/1931: On August 2, 1931 around 4:20 a.m., Officer Harry E. Williams, 32, was visiting some friends, Mr. and Mrs. John Fitzpatrick, at the Manzanita Hotel, 1607 1st Avenue. Officer Williams was off-duty and in plain clothes. John Fitzpatrick was the proprietor of the hotel. Williams, the Fitzpatricks, and another man were in the Fitzpatricks’ hotel room. Two other men came to the room. They were Bernard Byrne, 30, and Allen Price, 27. A disturbance started, and resulted in a gun battle in the hallway between Officer Williams and Byrne or Price.

more…

Officer Walter Cottle - 9/29/1930:  During the late evening hours of Saturday, September 27, 1930, Seattle Police Officer Walter G. Cottle, 41, was walking his beat. At 12th Ave. and E. Alder St., he observed a well-dressed white male wearing glasses. Cottle approached the man, and asked him what he was doing. As Cottle started to search the subject, there was a struggle. The suspect pulled a pistol from his pocket and shot the officer twice at close range. One bullet struck the officer in the jaw and entered his neck. A second shot struck the officer in the hip. Cottle fell to the ground with his flashlight in his hand, and his pistol still in its holster. The suspect fled on foot. Two witnesses, James Ross and Maurice Rudisell, ran to the service station at 12th Ave. and E. Fir St., and called the police. Officer Cottle was unconscious when he was rushed to Virginia Mason Hospital. He did regain consciousness long enough to give fellow officers a description of the suspect and an account of the incident. Officer Cottle underwent surgery to remove a bullet from his neck. He died around 10:00 p.m. on September 29, 1930.

more…

Officer Gene Perry - 9/21/1930:  On September 12, 1930, Officer Gene W. Perry, 43, was assigned to escort duty. He escorted Mr. J.W. McGinnis from the Dexter Horton Branch of Seattle First National Bank to the Central Terminal Station at 8th Ave. and Stewart St. Today we know it as the Greyhound Bus Station. McGinnis was carrying a money bag with $7,000 to cash the pay checks of employees working at the concessions inside the Station. Perry and McGinnis had arrived on the Stewart St. side of the Station around 10:45 a.m., and had started walking to the main entrance. A man stepped out of a Studebaker parked near that entrance. He was wearing a suit, a felt hat, and kid skin gloves. He also wore glasses and had a rifle. He told McGinnis to drop the money. Officer Perry reached for his revolver. The suspect fired two shots. One shot hit Perry in the abdomen.

more…

Officer Emery Sherard - 9/14/1928:  During the evening hours of September 14, 1928, three young men in a stolen automobile parked on University Way near the Jamieson Drug Company at 4759 University Way. Two of the men entered the drug store while the third remained outside. Inside the store, two of the armed suspects were robbing the clerk and customers. Outside the store, Seattle Officer Emery R. Sherard, 30, was walking his beat and approaching the drug store. The third suspect, acting as lookout, ran into the store and warned his accomplices. All three ran out of the store. Officer Sherard saw them, guns in their hands, and attempted to stop them as they jumped into their car. Officer Sherard fired at the suspects. The suspects fired back and sped off. One bullet struck Officer Sherard in the neck. He was first taken to Norwegian Hospital at 3515 Woodland Park Ave. He was then taken to City Hospital which was located inside the old Public Safety Building at 400 Yesler. Officer Emery Sherard died about four hours after he was shot.

more…

Officer Lyle Tracy - 9/7/1928:  On September 4, 1928, Seattle Motorcycle Officer Lyle F. Tracy was at Police Headquarters, 400 Yesler Way, and preparing to go on-duty. When Officer Tracy took his gun belt out of his locker, his pistol fell out of the holster. When it hit the floor it discharged. The bullet struck Officer Tracy in the base of the neck and grazed his spine. Officer Tracy was taken to City Hospital. He was partially paralyzed. Officer Tracy had just returned from vacation on Orcas Island. His wife, Sadie, was still on Orcas Island. Seattle Officer John Weedin was sent by plane to Anacortes where he took a special launch to Orcas Island. He notified Sadie Tracy of her husband’s injury. Officer Weedin and Mrs. Tracy returned to Seattle by plane. Officer Tracy’s condition was critical, but it had shown signs of improvement. During the afternoon of September 6, he lapsed into unconsciousness. He died during the morning of September 7, 1928.

more…